20 Coffee Terms that will make you sound like a Coffee pro

20 Coffee Terms that will make you sound like a Coffee pro

20 Coffee Terms that will make you sound like a Coffee pro

Do you love coffee but aren’t familiar with a lot of coffee terms?  Don’t worry, we will have you sounding like a coffee pro by the time you finish reading this blog. Here is a list of 20 easy terms that will make you feel that you know all things coffee!

Let’s begin:

Demitasse – it is a small cup that is used to serve an espresso

Body – it describes how the coffee feels in your mouth such a thickness, heaviness, or richness. It is also referred to as mouthfeel.

Cherry - The coffee plant produces a fruit which looks very similar to a cherry, and inside it you have two coffee beans.

Blend - A mixture of two or more different origin coffee beans. This is done to take the best qualities from different origins to create a smooth, well-balanced tasting coffee.

Single-Origin Coffee – An unblended coffee that comes from a single producer, crop, or region in one country.

Cupping – It is a way to taste, evaluate, and compare the flavor and quality of coffee. It is used by coffee professionals to taste and compare multiple coffees or multiple roast profiles of the same coffee.

Espresso – It is a method of making concentrated shot coffee. An espresso machine forces hot water through finely ground coffee using pressure. The beverage that’s produced is also called an espresso. 

Extraction – In the case of coffee, “extracting” is the act of pulling a rich concentrated liquid from coffee grounds by using hot water.

Arabica - Arabica coffee is a type of coffee made from the beans of the Coffea arabica plant. It is one of the two main varieties of coffee plants (the other being Robusta). It is a superior quality of coffee and accounts for about 70% of the coffee consumed worldwide.

Robusta - Robusta coffee is a type of coffee made from the beans of the Coffea canephora plant. It is the second most consumed coffee in the world.

Crema – it is a flavorful, aromatic, golden-brown froth that sits on top of an espresso shot. It is formed when air bubbles combine with coffee's soluble oils.

Etching – it is a latte art technique of drawing patters after pouring milk on the espresso with the help of a sharp pointed tool.

First Crack – it is an important stage in the coffee bean roasting process which is identified by the audible cracking of coffee beans as their internal temperature rises.

Green Coffee – refers to the green seeds of a coffee cherry. These are unroasted and green in color. (Coffee beans get that brown colour after roasting)

Mocha – a mixed coffee drink consisting of espresso, chocolate, and milk.

Peaberry – a coffee bean that comes from a coffee cherry only containing one seed rather than the usual two. 

Wet Process – refers to coffee beans that have been extracted from the coffee cherry before the fruit has dried.

Dry Process – also called natural process, this refers to coffee beans that have been extracted from the coffee cherry after the fruit has dried.

Instant Coffee - a poor-quality coffee in the form of granules or powder which has been dried. It often contains harmful chemicals as well. We believe that once you try freshly brewed coffee you won’t go back.

Coffee Capsule - These are aluminum or plastic containers with an aluminium foil seal. These capsules have freshly roasted ground coffee perfectly sealed inside. Coffeeza has 6 varieties of coffee capsule blends, which are also Nespresso Compatible.

We hope that this brief coffee glossary will help you understand terms used in the coffee culture a little more. As your love for coffee keeps growing, take the time to learn more about this beverage. Let’s end this blog with another interesting information gem. Did you know, coffee also has some cool nicknames used by people all around the world. Cup of Joe, Bean Juice, Liquid Gold, The Fix, Morning Brew, Java, Wake Up Juice are common slangs for coffee. How many did you come across before?

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